National Waste & Recycling Association

The National Waste & Recycling Association is the trade association that represents the private sector solid waste and recycling industry. Visit and learn more the Association at wasterecycling.org.

Begin with the Bin is a public education resource developed by the National Waste & Recycling Association.

The National Waste & Recycling Association is located at:
4301 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Suite 300, Washington, DC 20008
T: 800-424-2869, 202-244-4700
F: 202-966-4824
E: info@wasterecycling.org
Find us on Google

To use our contact form and to subscribe to our free publications, click here.
Media: Thom Metzger at 202-364-3751 or tmetzger@wasterecycling.org.

 
  • INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS SERVE COMMUNITIES WITH DISTINCTION
  • PAPER PRODUCTS HAVE A NEW LIFE THROUGH RECYCLING
  • ADVANCED LANDFILLS PRODUCE CLEAN, RENEWABLE ENERGY TO POWER AMERICA
  • THE WASTE & RECYCLING INDUSTRY IS PROVIDING RESPONSIBLE AND EFFECTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT ACROSS THE NATION
  • THINK AT THE BIN. RECYCLING PLASTICS MAKES SENSE
  • MODERN GARBAGE TRUCKS ARE INCREASINGLY RUNNING ON CLEAN NATURAL GAS

Begin with the Bin

Begin with the Bin is a public education resource developed by the National Waste & Recycling Association. The site offers information and resources related to the waste and recycling industries. Visit and learn more at beginwiththebin.org.

About the Bin

Trash – it’s a part of our everyday. We make trash, we see trash, and we dispose of trash. Trash is a big deal and it's worth our collective attention as a nation. We are moving in the right direction. Through technological advances and shifts in trash consciousness – society is beginning to waste less, recycle more, and reap other benefits from the responsible management of trash. It begins with the bin – what you do and don’t put into it. Visit these pages to learn more about where trash is going (and not going) in the future!

Trash Facts

A trash bag full of power

An average kitchen-size bag of trash contains enough energy to light a 100-watt light bulb for more than 24 hours (Covanta).

You’re helping lead the renewable energy future – did you know!?

The solid waste industry currently produces more than half of America's renewable energy, more than combined energy outputs of the solar, geothermal, hydroelectric, and wind power industries (U.S. DOE, Energy Information Administration).

Your great, great, great grandchild wants a sip of your soda!

A can or bottle is able to live forever. There is no limit to the number of times that glass or aluminum can be recycled. So, that soda you drink today, could theoretically be shared with your great, great, great grandchild!

Making a Difference


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Environmentalists.
Every Day.

  • NASA heats 31 buildings at its Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD, using energy from landfill gas.
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  • Mars Snackfood US factory is fueling a manufacturing facility with landfill gas.
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  • New York City’s Fresh Kills Landfill is being converted into one of the nation’s largest city parks.
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  • A Waste Management landfill and gas pipeline are helping to power a BMW manufacturing plant in South Carolina.
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  • In Florida, Waste Management is partnering to create an elephant preserve set to become an international resource in elephant conservation.
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  • The University of New Hampshire is covering 80 to 85 percent of its energy needs through landfill gas.
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  • Republic Services and Anheuser-Busch are partnering to cover 55 percent of a local brewery’s energy needs using landfill gas.
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  • Republic Services, Inc. combined a first-of-its-kind solar technology with an existing biogas-to-energy system to turn a Texas landfill into a sustainable energy park.
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  • One of California’s largest renewable energy projects is a landfill-gas-to-energy station that is powering the cities of Alameda and Palo Alto.
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  • Landfill gas may eventually displace as much as 50 percent of a Honeywell International chemical plant.
    Read more